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Health Information Technology Standards

Health Information Exchange (HIE) Priorities

Organizations that Set Priorities | Tutorials

Health Information Exchange and Health IT Standards Priorities
Priorities Setting Entities Domains
American Health Information Community (AHIC) Healthcare and Public Health
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program/Meaningful Use Healthcare and Public Health
Health Information Security and Privacy Collaboration (HISPC) Privacy and Security

Health Information Technology Policy Committee

Healthcare and Public Health
Health Information Technology Standards Committee Healthcare and Public Health
Joint Public Health Informatics Task Force (JPHIT) Public Health
National e-Health Collaborative (NeHC) Healthcare and Public Health
Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) Healthcare and Public Health
President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Healthcare and Public Health
State Alliance for e-HealthState and Regional Health Information Exchanges
State Health Policy Consortium (formerly HISPC) Privacy and Security

AHIC - The American Health Information Community

The American Health Information Community was a federal advisory body, chartered in 2005 to make recommendations to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on how to accelerate the development and adoption of health information technology and the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN).

AHIC defined priority areas (breakthroughs) and developed foundational use cases that were then used by HITSP to harmonize standards and develop interoperability specifications. In 2008 AHIC transitioned to the National e-Health Collaborative (NeHC).

 

Use Case table

 

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program/Meaningful Use

Under the 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, eligible health care professionals and hospitals can qualify for Medicare and Medicaid incentive payments when they adopt certified EHR technology and use it to achieve specified objectives, or "meaningful use". To achieve meaningful use, EHR technologies must have certain technical capabilities, and providers must meet the specified objectives and measures. Meaningful use objectives encourage use of common technical capabilities, and electronic information exchange by participants in the EHR Incentive Program.

 

Health Information Privacy and Security Collaboration (HISPC)

Health Information Privacy and Security Collaboration was formed to address the privacy and security challenges that impede electronic health information exchanges. Thirty-four (34) State and Territorial teams assessed their laws, policies and practices with respect to health information privacy and security and developed implementation plans to address identified barriers.

HISPC Phase 1 (2006-June 2007) were to:

  • Identify both best practices and challenges
  • Develop consensus-based solutions for interoperable electronic health information exchange (HIE) that protect the privacy and security of health information, and
  • Develop detailed implementation plans to implement solutions.

HISPC Phase 2 (July - December 2007) focused on the implementation of State's plans.

HISPC Phase 3 (January 2008 - April 2009) focused on multi-state Collaboratives to develop common, replicable multi-state solutions. The table below lists the Collaboratives and the participating States and Territories:

Use Case table

 

Health Information Technology Policy Committee (a Federal Advisory Committee)

The Health Information Technology Policy Committee (HIT Policy Committee) was established
by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. The HIT Policy Committee makes recommendations to the HHS National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) on a policy framework for the development and adoption of a nationwide health information infrastructure, including standards for the exchange of patient medical information.

ARRA provides that the Health IT Policy Committee shall at least make recommendations on the areas in which standards, implementation specifications, and certifications criteria are needed.

Public Health Data Standards Consortium’s active member Dr. Michael J. Klag, Dean, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, was recently appointed as a member to this committee.

 

Health Information Technology Standards Committee (a Federal Advisory Committee)

The Health Information Technology Standards Committee (HIT Standards Committee) was established by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. The HIT Standards Committee makes recommendations to the HHS National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) on HIT standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for the electronic exchange and use of health information.

 

Joint Public Health Informatics Task Force (JPHIT)

JPHIT is a collaboration of public health associations committed to improving population health through informatics, health IT and information exchange. As a consortium of membership associations, JPHIT is unique within the field of public health. Created in 2008, JPHIT provides a forum that enables coordinated and collaborative development and implementation of public health informatics priorities, a unified voice on national informatics policy issues, and a focus on improving performance of the public health system through informatics. Since its creation, JPHIT has created and communicated unified positions on issues such as proposed Meaningful Use requirements, public health representatives on national health IT advisory committees, the organization of informatics within CDC, and other issues.

National e-Health Collaborative (NeHC)

NeHC's mission is to help address barriers that could thwart the nation's progress toward interoperability. Through its NeHC University stakeholder education program, its Consumer Consortium on eHealth stakeholder engagement program, its support of the Nationwide Health Information Network Exchange (NwHIN), its collaborative online community and its ongoing study of leading health information exchanges, NeHC works to educate, connect and encourage healthcare stakeholders who are critical to the successful deployment of health information technology and health information exchange nationwide.

National Use Cases for the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) were identified by the American Health Information Community (AHIC) during 2005-2009. Interoperability specifications for these Use Cases have been developed by the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP). These specifications identified health information technology standards to support electronic health information exchanges defined by the Use Cases.

Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC)

ONC is the principal Federal entity charged with coordination of nationwide efforts to implement and use the most advanced health information technology and the electronic exchange of health information. ONC's mission includes:

  • Promoting development of a nationwide Health IT infrastructure that allows for electronic use and exchange of information
  • Providing leadership in the development, recognition, and implementation of standards and the certification of Health IT products;
  • Health IT policy coordination;
  • Strategic planning for Health IT adoption and health information exchange; and
  • Establishing governance for the Nationwide Health Information Network.

President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST)

PCAST is an advisory group of the nation's leading scientists and engineers who directly advise the President and the Executive Office of the President. PCAST makes policy recommendations in the many areas where understanding of science, technology, and innovation is key to strengthening the economy and forming policy that works for the American people. PCAST's report "Realizing the Full Potential of Health Information Technology to Improve Healthcare for Americans: The Path Forward," provides recommendations for using health IT to facilitate the real-time exchange of patient information. PCAST recommends that ONC and CMS develop guidelines to spur adoption of an exchange language for use by health information technology systems and to facilitate a transition from traditional electronic health records — whose usefulness is largely limited to a single physician's office — to a more medically useful and secure system in which individual bits of healthcare data are tagged with privacy and security specifications. This effort is continuing under the PCAST Advisory Committee.

 

State Alliance for e-Health, National Governors Association (NGA)

The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices was awarded a contract from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) to establish and manage the State Alliance for e-Health, a consensus-based, executive-level body of state elected (and appointed) officials to collectively address state-level health information technology issues and challenges to interoperable electronic health information exchange. The State Alliance was composed of state governors, legislators, high-level officials, and technical experts.

State Alliance for e-Health work was conducted through the following Taskforces:

  • Health Information Protection
  • Health Care Practices
  • Health Information Communications and Data Exchange
  • Privacy and Security
  • Public Programs Implementation

State Health Policy Consortium

State Health Policy Consortium is an ONC backed initiative that continues to support work begun under HISPC and the State Alliance for e-Health/HITSP to resolve policy issues that will facilitate information exchange across states. States requesting support build upon current efforts to promote solutions to policy challenges to interstate electronic health information exchange. States must also build upon work conducted previously under the Health Information Security and Privacy Collaboration and the State Alliance for e-Health. Supported projects must be completed by March 1, 2013.